Timeline: 1833 - Present

Here we present notable events in segments that reflect four significant periods of Emory's history:

  • 1833 - 1914: Founding of Emory College to founding of the Candler School of Theology
  • 1915 - 1947: Chartering of Emory University to end of the pre-research university
  • 1948 - 1978: Granting of Emory's first PhD degree to pre-Woodruff Gift
  • 1979 - Present: Woodruff Gift to present

1833

The Georgia Methodist Conference first contemplates the establishment of a church-sponsored manual labor school, where students would combine farm work with a college preparatory curriculum. In doing so, they plant the seed that becomes Emory College and then Emory University.

1834

At a meeting of the Georgia Methodist Conference, a preacher known as "Uncle" Allen Turner declares that Georgia Methodists should have their own college instead of supporting Randolph-Macon in Virginia. On December 18, the General Assembly of Georgia charters the Georgia Methodists Conference Manual Labor School.

1835

In March the Georgia Conference Manual Labor School opens west of Covington, in Newton County, with physician and minister Alexander Means as superintendent. During the first year, the school's debts mount and subscriptions dwindle. Despite these problems, the Board of Trustees, at the urging of Ignatius Few, ask the Conference to expand the school into a college.

1836

On December 10, the Georgia General Assembly grants the Georgia Methodist Conference, represented by Ignatius Few, a charter to establish a college to be named for John Emory, a popular bishop who presided at the 1834 conference and died in a carriage accident in 1835.

1837

The organization of Emory College begins. At its first meeting the Board of Trustees accept land belonging to the Manual Labor School on which to situate the "contemplated college" and the proposed new town they would call Oxford.

1837

The first literary society, Phi Gamma (for which Phi Gamma Hall is named), may have been founded before classes begin in September; it is certainly founded by 1839, when a rival organization, the Few Society, originates.

1837

Ignatius Few, a Princeton-educated lawyer, a planter, and a skeptic-turned-Methodist, is elected as Emory College's first president.

1837

The first faculty members appointed by the trustees are Alexander Means, George W. Lane, Archelaus Mitchell and George H. Round, all Methodist preachers.

1838

Emory College classes begin on September 17 for 15 students.

1840

Augustus Longstreet, a Yale-educated lawyer, a planter, an editor, a judge and the author of Georgia Scenes, becomes Emory College's second president.

1840

The Emory College Board of Trustees takes over all the assets and liabilities of the financially shaky Manual Labor School.

1840

Emory becomes the home of a "Temple" of the Mystic Seven, reputedly the first chapter of a national fraternity to be established in the South.

1841

Emory College's first graduates -- Henry Bass, Adam C. Potter and Armistead R. Holcombe -- receive their diplomas.

1844

The General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church votes to suspend Bishop James O. Andrew, president of Emory's Board of Trustees and a resident of Oxford. He had inherited two slaves and could not free them under Georgia law. After the vote, the church splits along sectional lines, and Oxford becomes the intellectual center of Methodism in the Southeast.

1845

L.Q.C. Lamar graduates from Emory College. He later serves in the U.S. House of Representatives, as a U.S. senator, as Secretary of the Interior, and as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

1848

Joseph S. Key graduates; 38 years later, he becomes the first Emory alumnus to serve as a Methodist Church bishop.

1850

Emory students debate the question, "Should Georgia secede from the Union?" By a vote of members of the literary societies, the negative wins.

1852

Work begins at Oxford on a much-needed main building to provide space for a library, science demonstrations classes and an auditorium.

1854

Alexander Means, a largely self-educated physician and chemist and a Methodist minister, becomes Emory College's fourth president.

1854

The Atlanta Medical College is founded, becoming the first of several forerunners of Emory University's School of Medicine.

1855

James R. Thomas, a graduate of Randolph-Macon College, a former president of Collinsworth Institute in Georgia, and a former professor at Wesleyan Female College, becomes Emory College's fifth president.

1857

President Thomas bans fraternities at Emory because rivalries between them had reached, he says, "a pitch of bloody desperation" and late-night meetings had encouraged students to engage in "vicious revel."

1859

All Emory College dormitories, branded "facilities for mischief," are closed.

1861

Alexander Means, a delegate to the January convention that passed Georgia's act of secession, first speaks in favor of delaying the act, but later votes for the Secession Ordinance in its final version.

1861

In April a Confederate flag is raised at Emory College, and volunteers for the Confederate Army are recruited.

1861

In November Emory College closes its doors until, the trustees write, peace should "take the place of the present public agitation." During the war, the unused college buildings are first commandeered as a Confederate hospital and then occupied by Northern troops; three Emory graduates attain the rank of brigadier general; and 35 Emory men lose their lives in the service of the Confederate Army.

1867

In response to the need for "practical" education, Emory adds a three-year program that does not require Greek or Latin to its standard four-year curriculum emphasizing the classics.

1867

Luther M. Smith, an Emory College-educated lawyer and professor of Greek, becomes Emory College's sixth president.

1869

The Board of Trustees lift the ban on fraternities imposed 12 years earlier and give official sanction to chapters of Chi Phi and Kappa Alpha.

1870

Sunrise prayers, previously mandatory for students, are discontinued.

1871

Osborn L. Smith, an Emory-educated teacher of languages, a former president of Wesleyan College, a former member of the Georgia legislature, and a Methodist minister, becomes the seventh president of Emory College.

1871

The main building at Oxford, virtually destroyed during the war, is condemned. Bishop George F. Pierce, president of Emory College when the structure was erected, launches a major drive to raise funds for new buildings.

1873

While Emory College is still struggling to overcome the financial devastation of the war, a nationwide economic panic results in a drop in enrollment and a corresponding drop in school income.

1875

Atticus Greene Haygood, an Emory-educated Methodist minister and a former editor of the Sunday School publications of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, becomes Emory College's eighth president.

1880

The Emory Mirror, the first major student publication for which copies of successive issues are extant, appears. In 1886 The Mirror and a shorter-lived rival called The Georgia College Journal merge to form a new paper called The Emory Phoenix.

1880

President Haygood preaches a Thanksgiving Day sermon entitled "The New South," in which he urges Southerners to put provincialism and illiteracy behind them and to cultivate the growth of industry. The printed sermon later finds its way to George I. Seney, a New York banker and Methodist layman, who responds by giving $130,000 to Emory College. Part of the money is used to finance the construction of Seney Hall.

1882

Under President Haygood's direction, Emory College begins to offer many technical and professional subjects in addition to courses required for degrees. The classes are designed to produce citizens who would be skilled workers as well as educated men.

1884

At the college's first intercollegiate debate of record, Emory students and students from Mercer University in Macon argue the question of women's suffrage. Emory students present the affirmative position and lose.

1884

Isaac Stiles Hopkins, a graduate of Emory, a Georgia Medical College-educated physician, and a Methodist minister, becomes Emory College's ninth president.

1884-1887

Mary "Mamie" Haygood Ardis takes classes at Emory College in Oxford, Georgia alongside male students. However, the daughter of the former Emory College president has to transfer to Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia, to complete her degree. Considered Emory's first known co-ed, her name is included in the first alumni directory, published in 1926.

1887

The Southern Dental College, founded as a department of Atlanta Medical College, is the first of several forerunners of Emory University's Dental School.

1888

President Hopkins, a strong advocate for technical subjects, resigns to become the first president of the Georgia School of Technology (later renamed the Georgia Institute of Technology).

1888

Warren Akin Candler, an Emory-educated Methodist minter and former assistant editor of the Nashville-based Christian Advocate, becomes Emory College's 10th president.

1889

President Candler persuades the state legislature to admit graduates of Emory's law program to the Georgia Bar. Emory confers its first bachelor of laws degree.

1891

The Emory Board of Trustees passes a resolution against intercollegiate sports "in view of [their] demoralizing influence ... upon the habits of students and the strong tendency to gambling which such games foster."

1891

Members of Kappa Alpha obtain permission to build Emory College's first fraternity house.

1893

The Zodiac, Emory's first yearbook, appears. It contains a photograph of the Glee Club, the first pictorial record of that group's existence.

1895

Asa G. Candler sends the first keg of Coca-Cola syrup ever seen in Oxford to his son, a student at the college, around this time. Ads call the new drink "delicious, refreshing, exhilarating," adding "May be served hot or cold."

1895

The Emory Alumni Association is incorporated.

1898

Charles E. Dowman, an Emory-educated Methodist minister and professor of languages, becomes the 11th president of Emory College. He is instrumental in establishing electives as a regular part of the curriculum.

1899

Bishop Warren Candler's brother, Asa Candler, who had purchased the formula for Coca-Cola in 1888 and begun to market the soft drink in 1890, is elected to the Emory Board of Trustees. He becomes a generous patron of the college and later the university.

1899

A curious letter entitled "Reflections of the Skeleton" appears in the Phoenix. It is written by a skeleton in the science room who bemoans the fact that his quiet existence among silent pickled frogs and "canned quadrupeds" has been interrupted by "these college boys." While the name Dooley does not appear, the letter foreshadows his emergence 10 years later as the Spirit of Emory.

1902

James Edward Dickey, an Emory-educated Methodist minister and a professor of mental and moral science, becomes the 12th president of Emory College.

1902

This year's graduating class is the first to wear caps and gowns.

1902

Andrew Sledd, Latin professor at Emory and son-in-law of Bishop Warren Candler, publishes an article in the Atlantic Monthly condemning the practice of lynching. A subsequent letter in the Atlanta Constitution creates a storm of protest against the professor and Emory. Sledd resigns his teaching post but later returns to teach at the university in Atlanta.

1904

Pierce Science Hall is completed at Oxford. It is the first building on campus to have steam, gas and running water.

1905

Wesley Memorial Hospital opens in an Atlanta antebellum home, and a training school for nurses is established. This school provides the foundation for Emory University's School of Nursing.

1908

A quiet, self-assured freshman named Robert Winship Woodruff attends Emory College but leaves before his first term is over, complaining to his father that his eyes fairly ache from studying. He later becomes Emory University's most generous benefactor.

1914

When the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, decides to found a university east of the Mississippi River, Atlanta offers the church $500,000 and the use of Wesley Memorial Church and Wesley Memorial Hospital. Asa G. Candler writes a letter offering the church $1 million for use in establishing the school. At the meeting where the letter is read, Atlanta is chosen as the location, and Bishop Warren Candler is named chancellor.

1914

The School of Theology opens at Wesley Memorial Church in September. In February 1915 it is named the Candler School of Theology in honor of Bishop Candler.

1915

On January 25, Judge C.S. Reid of the Superior Court of DeKalb County grants a charter to Emory University.

1915

Likely guided by its president, Asa G. Candler, the Druid Hills Company deeds 75 rolling, wooded acres known as the Guess Place to Emory University.

1915

The second Atlanta Medical College, a descendant of the original one founded in 1854, becomes Emory University's School of Medicine.

1915

Emory Academy, a preparatory school, is established at Oxford after plans are made to move the college to the university campus in Atlanta.

1915

Asa Candler is elected the first president of the University Board of Trustees.

1916

The Lamar College of Law, named for alumnus L.Q.C. Lamar, is established. The law college and the Candler School of Theology move into the first two academic buildings completed on the Druid Hills campus.

1917

When the United States enters World War I, the university organizes a medical unit that would be known as Emory Unit, Base Hospital 43. It is composed mainly of medical school faculty and medical alumni and serves at Blois, France, from July 1918 to January 1919.

1917

Eléonore  Raoul enrolls in Emory's newly opened Lamar School of Law. She graduates in 1920, among the first women to earn a degree from the university. Celelia Branham is awarded an MA degree.

1918

A campaign led by Bishop Warren Akin Candler and physician James L. Campbell of the medical school to exempt college endowments from taxation by the state is successful, as Georgia voters overwhelmingly approve a constitutional amendment to that effect.

1919

The Emory University Museum is founded with a mission to "preserve and display university collections of ethnic, biological, geological, archaeological and historical material."

1919

Emory College joins the law school, the theology school and the pre-clinical program of the medical school on the Druid Hills campus. The School of Business Administration and the Graduate School are founded.

1919

Emory's Graduate School is established as a separate unit from the university, and is coeducational from the outset. C.B. Branham receives her master's degree from the school the following year.

1920

Harvey Warren Cox, a Harvard-educated professor philosophy and former dean of the Teachers' College of the University of Florida, becomes Emory University's first president.

1920

A letter in the Wheel complains that the only pay phone on campus is "continually out of order" and that students who need to use a phone at night often have to go to Little Five Points, two miles away.

1920

Among the rules for Emory University freshmen are admonitions "to be seen and not heard except in a group of their own men," to "give seats to ladies on streetcars," and to "remember that the dinner bell did not invite them to a swinish festival."

1922

Wesley Memorial Hospital, which has trained nurses since 1905, outgrows its downtown location and moves to a new building the Druid Hills campus, bringing with it female students. Three years later it is formally transferred to the university, and within a few years its name is changed to Emory University Hospital.

1923

The first freshman-sophomore pushball contest ends in a tie.

1924

The Emory Alumnus, forerunner of Emory Magazine, is first published.

1925

The Library School of the Carneige Library of Atlanta becomes affiliated with Emory University.

1926

The Glee Club tours England on its first transatlantic trip. The group has previously been to Newborn, Georgia, and later peforms in Cuba and in Washington, D.C.

1926

The Asa G. Candler Library is dedicated.

1927

The children of Joel Chandler Harris, Atlanta author of the Uncle Remus stories, donates a large collection of his manuscripts to the university library's growing Southern collection.

1927

Sigma Alpha Epsilon begins the construction of the first house on fraternity row.

1928

Curriculum readjustments lead to the creation of junior and senior divisions within the college. In the junior division students acquire a general background in standard fields of knowledge; in the senoir division, students pursue specialized studies.

1928

Emory University opens a two-year division in Valdosta.

1928

The university's first drama group, the Emory Players, performs Booth Tarkington's "The Trysting Place."

1929

Asa Candler, who had given Emory a total of $8 million, dies. His son, Emory alumnus Charles Howard Candler, becomes president of the Board of Trustees.

1929

Emory authorizes a two-year program of college courses at Oxford.

1929

Phi Beta Kappa installs a chapter at Emory.

1936

Emory marks its Centennial with a 10-day celebration. On Centennial Day, December 10, President Cox announces by radio the launching of a $6 million development program.

1929

Evangeline Papageorge becomes the first full-time female faculty member at Emory's School of Medicine, teaching biochemistry and clinical chemistry from 1929 - 1956, and then serves as its first dean of students.

1930

The university-affiliated Library School of the Carneige Library of Atlanta moves its education program to campus, granting degrees to women as part of its regular policies. Previous library school alumnae are granted retroactive membership into the Emory Alumni Association, meaning there are now women who graduated a decade before Eléonore  Raoul.

1930

The ROTC program is discontinued.

1930

Bobby Jones, who attended Emory's School of Law during 1926 and 1927, becomes the first golfer to win the game's Grand Slam.

1931

Glenn Memorial Church is completed and dedicated as a memorial to Wilbur Fisk Glenn, an Emory College alumnus and a prominent Methodist minister.

1931

Edwin R. Embree, president of the Julius Rosenwald Fund, visits Emory and proposes the formation of a university center in the Atlanta area. The idea takes hold; today the university and other institutions of higher learning in the state are linked by an interlibrary loan system, and their students are allowed to register for courses at other member institutions.

1931

Grady Hospital in downtown Atlanta opens wards for medical instruction on a limited basis. Access to Grady greatly expands the facilities for the clinical training of students in the School of Medicine.

1932

At a faculty meeting, President Cox announces the first salary cuts made necessary by the Depression.

1933

Workers pave the last strip of dirt road left on the campus.

1933

A 100,000-gallon water tower is erected at Emory that looks like a giant golf ball on a tee; it comes to be known as the Bobby Jones Memorial.

1934

Emory graduate student Nathan Yagol and five other people at an informal interracial meeting are arrested and charged with inciting insurrection, a capital offense in Georgia. Police indicate they believe the participants are Communists. The suspects are held without bail for three weeks before a grand jury frees them. President Cox and 69 faculty members issue a statement affirming the university's commitment to democracy, while deploring police methods of "terrorism and suppression."

1936

Tommie Dora Barker becomes the founding dean and director of Emory's Library School (1936 - 1954). She is also the first woman to receive an honorary degree from Emory, recognizing her leadership in library science education.

1937

Emory receives the Haygood-Hopkins Memorial Gate, a donation from Emory College alumnus and trustee Linton B. Robeson.

1937

Robert W. Woodruff first shows his interest in Emory by founding a clinic for the study and treatment of neoplastic diseases.

1938

Emory's enrollment passs the 1,500-student mark for the first time.

1938

Emory creates a stir in academic circles by discarding all technicalities of entrance requirements and instead stipulating merely a well-rounded course of high school study and graduation from an accredited institution.

1938

The Department of Journalism is organized. It receives accreditation in 1941.

1940

After World War II breaks out in Europe, Emory reorganizes its medical unit, first created during World War I. The university also organizes a committee on national defense.

1940

Luther C. Fischer deeds Crawford W. Long Memorial Hospital in downtown Atlanta to Emory, effective upon his death.

1941

Students receive permission to attend class six days a week during January so they can accrue time for a vacation before they are drafted into military service.

1941

Bishop Warren Akin Candler, former president of Emory College, one of the men most instrumental in founding the university, and the university's first chancellor, dies. He is buried at Oxford Cemetery.

1941

The university sponsors a dance on the campus for the first time, after Bishop Candler's death removes the most powerful opponent of this form of recreation.

1941

The School of Law opens an evening division.

1941

Dooley's Frolics begin when the skeleton appears at preparations for the Winter Frolics and declares, "This is my party."

1941

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, President Cox cautions the student body against hysteria.

1942

Emory begins to offer"war emergency" courses, including chemical warfare, food values and military law.

1942

Goodrich C. White, an Emory alumnus who had served as dean of the college and the graduate school and as a vice president, becomes Emory University's second president.

1942

The Emory medical unit, now known as the 43rd General Hospital, moves to Camp Livingston in Louisiana before being transferred to North Africa in 1943.

1943

Emory's School of Medicine admits its first female student, Elizabeth Gambrell. She goes on to become its first female graduate, the second woman to serve as a full-time faculty member, and the first female chief resident at Grady Memorial Hospital.

1943

After the Army sent medical trainees to Emory and the Navy instituted a college training program known as V-12, military students outnumber civilians two to one. The Navy has exclusive right of all dormitories and the university cafeteria.

1944

The Nursing School begings to offer a collegiate program.

1944

Atlanta-Southern Dental College becomes Emory's School of Dentistry.

1944

Businesswoman Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans becomes Emory's first female trustee, serving through 1953.

1945

The Navy V-12 program is discontinued.

1946

A 10,700-ton cargo ship is christened the M.S. Emory Victory in recognition of the university's contribution to the war effort.

1946

Nursing graduates of Wesley Memorial Hospital are welcomed into the Emory Alumni Association.

1946

The U.S. Public Health Service announces it will build a communicable disease research center on land made available by and adjacent to Emory. The center, later renamed the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, opens in 1960.

1946

The GI Bill creates an influx of students, pushing Emory's enrollment to 2,045 in the spring and 3,583 in the fall. To provide housing, the university obtains more than 1,000 war-surplus trailers dubbed "Trailertown," three federal public housing dormitories known as "Lower Slobovia," and plywood and tar-paper barracks designated "Mudville." The university appoints 189 new faculty and staff members and adds 98 faculty housing units.

1948

Alumnus Alben William Barkley is elected as Vice President of the United States.

1948

Chemistry graduate student Thomas P. Johnston earns Emory's first PhD degree.

1948

The Library School becomes part of the graduate school as the Division of Library and Information Sciences.

1950

Fall enrollment drops as students join the armed forces when the U.S. becomes involved in the conflict between North and South Korea.

1950

The Alumni Memorial Student Center opens; it is later renamed the Alumni Memorial University Center (AMUC) and is now known as the Dobbs University Center (the DUC).

1950

In the five years since the end of World War II, Emory builds or acquires 107 new buildings, many of them temporary structures.

1951

A new program of adult education long known as Evening at Emory, now part of Emory Continuing Education, offers non-credit night courses.

1952

Police are called to help contain a panty raid.

1952

The university establishes in interdisciplinary graduate program called the Institute of the Liberal Arts.

1953

The Board of Trustees formally sanctions coeducation and the regular admission of women into Emory College and the School of Business. At the time, there is no dedicated university housing for female students, who must live off campus for several years.

1953

The administration decides to phase out the Division of Journalism.

1953

A group of Emory men shave a monkey and pass it off to faculty members as a visitor from outer space. The incident becomes known as The Great Monkey Hoax.

1953

The two-year division of Emory-at-Valdosta closes.

1953

The Emory University Clinic is organized to enable physicians to maintain private practices while also teaching and conducting research at the university.

1955

Pushball is abolished for the second and final time because it resulted in "mob violence" and sometimes serious injuries.

1955

A new administration building opens, the first on the Druid Hills campus. A gift of Charles H. Candler, it completes the Quadrangle begun in 1916.

1956

Trustees of Henrietta Egleston Hospital for Children sign an agreement to affiliate with Emory and move to a site adjacent to the campus.

1956

Yale University gives Emory its Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology, then located in Orange Park, Florida. Yerkes is later designated one of seven federally sponsored regional primate research centers.

1957

Atlanta attorney Henry L. Bowden becomes the third chairman of the University Board of Trustees.

1957

Judy Greer joins the Oxford College faculty as a physical education instructor and becomes the first woman at Oxford promoted to full professor.

1957

Sidney Walter Martin, former dean of the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Georgia, becomes Emory University's third president.

1958

The university purchases Lullwater Estate form the Candler family. In 1963 the estate becomes a park for the Emory community and the residence of the university president.

1958

Emory University issues a statement deploring the possibility that public schools would be closed in Georgia rather than integrated, and a non-credit course entitled "Crisis in the Schools" wins national attention.

1959

Ten sororities receive national charters and arrive on campus.

1960

The first 12 Charles Howard Candler professorships are awarded in recognition of outstanding teaching, scholarship and service to the school.

1962

Chancellor Goodrich C. White, Vice President and Dean of Faculties Judson C. Ward, Jr. and Chairman of the Board of Trustees Henry L. Bowden collectively lead Emory University.

1962

Emory sues the DeKalb County Tax Commissioner, challenging state law that prohibits private institutions from racial integration without losing their tax-exempt status. The Georgia Supreme Court rules in Emory's favor, opening the doors to an integrated student body.

1963

Nursing students Verdell Bellamy and Allie Saxon enter Emory's School of Nursing in January and become the first African Amerian students to graduate from the university when they receive master's degrees the following December.

1963

Sanford Atwood, a graduate of the University of Wisconsin and a former professor of agronomy, department chairman, dean of the Graduate School, and provost of Cornell University, becomes Emory University's fourth president.

1963

The Emory Clinic addition is completed.

1963

A Catholic Requiem mass is said to a "deeply moved" overflow crowd at Glenn Memorial Church for assassinated President John F. Kennedy.

1965

Time magazine reports a handful of young theologians had proclaimed God dead, and that one of the idea's chief proponents is Emory College's Thomas J.J. Altizer. Amid international controversy, some angry alumni call for his dismissal. President Atwood stands firm in defense of academic freedom. The episode erupts while university trustees plan a $25 million capital campaign.

1965

The university observes its 50th year; "Emory University 1915-1965: A Semicentennial History" is published.

1966

Emory students organize Affirmation: Vietnam, activities designed to express support for the war in Southeast Asia. The project culminates in a sparsely attended, rain-drenched rally at Atlanta-Fulton Country Stadium and wins the George Washington Honor Medal given by the Freedom Foundation of Valley Forge, but is not universally acclaimed on campus.

1966

The Board of Trustees renames the university's medical complex the Woodruff Medical Center in honor of longtime benefactor Robert W. Woodruff.

1967

Wonderful Wednesdays begins after the faculty vote to give students relief from classes one day a week.

1968

Lore Metzger joins Emory College as its first female full professor, teaching English and comparative literature.

1968

The Black Student Alliance is organized.

1968

Many Emory students join marchers in Atlanta who accompany the mule-drawn farm wagon that carries Martin Luther King Jr. to his grave.

1969

Student unrest continues. Student Government Association President Steve Abbott is convicted for refusing to serve in the armed forces.

1969

In response to Black Student Alliance demands that Emory hire its first full-time black administrator, Marvin Arrington, a graduate of the Emory School of Law, is appointed student personnel adviser.

1969

The Robert W. Woodruff Library for Advanced Studies is dedicated.

1970

Students receive 24-hour visitation rights in the men's dorms. The women's dorms are opened on a more limited basis.

1970

Students receive more freedom in choosing courses to meet basic academic requirements.

1970

The Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing moves into new quarters.

1970

Students protest the Vietnam War, the killing of unarmed students at Kent State University in Ohio, and the presence of an ROTC unit on the Emory campus. The Board of Trustees recognize students' right of dissent but stipulate that dissent must be "orderly and peaceful, and represent constructive alternatives reasonably presented."

1971

Delores Aldridge is the first African American scholar to hold a tenure-track position in Emory College. She becomes the founding director of the Black Studies program, now the Department of African American Studies.

1972

The Methodist Church designates the entire town of Oxford, including the college campus, a historical shrine.

1972

Male student Ira Luft is named Miss Emory.

1972

University libraries add their 1,000,000th volume.

1972

Gilbert Hall becomes Emory's first coed dormitory and the first to offer apartment-style living on campus.

1973

A new home for the School of Law, Gambrell Hall, opens.

1973

Streaking is popular among Emory students and, to illustrate the fad, the Wheel prints a frontal view of a nude man. The decision costs the editor his job.

1974

The ROTC unit at Emory is deactivated.

1975

Emory's purchase of the 220,000-volume Hartford Seminary book collection helps make the theology library one of the best in the nation.

1975

Dumas Malone becomes the first Emory alumnus to win a Pulitzer Prize. Malone wins the history award for the first five volumes of Jefferson and his Time, a biography.

1976

The Woodruff Health Sciences Center Administration Building is dedicated.

1976

Building on the work of the Emory Women's Caucus, an informal group of students and faculty, President Sanford Atwood creates the President's Commission on the Status of Women to advise him on issues pertaining to women, including recruitment and hiring.

1977

James Thomas Laney, a Yale-educated professor of Christian ethics and dean of the Candler School of Theology, beomes the fifth president of Emory University.

1977

Alumnus David M. Potter posthumously wins the Pulitzer Prize in history for The Impending Crisis, a book about the events leading to the Civil War during the years 1848 through 1861.

1977

Goodrich C. White Hall opens.

1978

The first dean for campus life is appointed to enhance the quality of life outside the classroom.

1978

Roberta Bondi joins Candler School of Theology as its first tenured female faculty member.

1979

Emory receives approximately $105 million from the Emily and Ernest Woodruff Fund. This endowment, given by the university's longtime benefactors Robert W. Woodruff and his brother, George W. Woodruff, is the largest single gift made to an educational institution in the nation's history at the time.

1979

The university announces that through the Campaign for Emory it would work to raise approximately $55 million in five years.

1979

The renovated Houston Mill House opens to serve as a center for the university's social functions.

1979

Robert Strickland, chairman of the Trust Company of Georgia and grandson of James Dickey, the last president of Emory College, becomes the fourth chairman of the university's Board of Trustees.

1979

The university breaks ground for the William R. Cannon Chapel. U.S. President Jimmy Carter delivered the principal address.

1980

Woodruff professorships funded by the $105 million gift from Robert and George Woodruff are established "to attract to Emory a critical mass of internationally distinguished men and women."

1980

The university establishes a number of self-study committees to determine how best to use income from the Woodruff gift to enable Emory to play and important and creative role in the nation's intellectual endeavors.

1980

The number of women entering the college equals the number of men for the first time.

1980

University students organize Volunteer Emory.

1981

The Robert W. Woodruff scholarships and fellowships are created to attract outstanding students to the University.

1982

The university calendar switches to a semester system, which eliminates Wonderful Wednesdays in Emory College.

1982

William Arrowsmith, translator and classicist, and Richard Ellmann, Goldsmith Professor of English Literature at Oxford, are named the first two Woodruff professors. They are later joined by Ulric Neisser, psychology; Richard M. Krause, medicine; Harold J. Berman, international law; and Robert Shaw, music and the humanities.

1982

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter joins the faculty as a University Distinguished Professor. Emory announces it will establish a public policy research center, The Carter Center of Emory University, to work with the Carter Presidential Library and to study issues such as arms control, the Middle East, world health and human rights.

1982

Alumnus C. Vann Woodward wins the Pulitzer Prize in History for his edition of Mary Chestnut's Civil War, a diary-style account of life in the South written by the wife of a Confederate landowner and statesman.

1983

The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center opens.

1983

The Pollard Turman Residential Center opens.

1983

The University began a five-year program to increase scholarships by 400 percent to enable any qualified applicant to attend Emory of Oxford colleges regardless of need.

1983

Alumnus Claude F. Sitton, editor of the Raleigh News and Observer and a former Southern correspondent for the New York Times, wins the Pulitzer Prize for journalistic commentary for ten of his newspaper columns.

1984

Alumnus Louis Harlan, a professor of history at the University of Maryland, wins the Pulitzer Prize in biography for Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee, 1901-1915.

1984

At the end of the five-year Campaign for Emory, $220,473,947 has been raised. The amount exceeds the original goal by more than $60 million.

1985

In the spring the American Dental Association approved the University's plan to phase out its Doctor of Dental Surgery program by 1988. The Board of Trustees had voted to take the step citing a decreasing national pool of qualified applicants and continuing financial losses.

1985

Renovation of the Old Law Building provides space for the new Emory University Museum of Art and Archaeology and for the departments of art history and anthropology. The building is renamed Michael C. Carlos Hall for its benefactor.

1985

The Emory Transplant Center successfully performs its first heart transplant. By the end of the year, nine more of the transplant procedures have been performed with all patients still living.

1985

Business leader and philanthropist Robert W. Woodruff dies at the age of 95. During his lifetime he gave away an estimated $350 million, $230 million of it to Emory.

1986

A varsity basketball team begins play during the 1986 - 1987 season, and Emory joins newly formed consolidation of independent research-oriented schools called the University Athletic Association. Other charter UAA members are Carnegie Mellon, Case Western Reserve, the University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins, Washington University, New York University, and the University of Rochester.

1986

Expecting a freshman class of 950, Emory College experiences a 30 percent increase in yield. University administrators labor to find places for 300 additional freshmen in dormitories and classrooms.

1986

Atlanta businessman O. Wayne Rollins contributes $10 million toward the $40 million cost of a new research center in the life sciences.

1986

The Carter Presidential Center, which includes The Carter Center of Emory University and the Presidential Library and Museum, is dedicated in a ceremony attended by President and Mrs. Ronald Reagan.

1986

Emory's alumni, following the recommendations of an alumni panel, reconstitute themselves as the Association of Emory Alumni and the Emory Alumni Fund.

1986

The first phase of the R. Howard Dobbs University Center is completed.

1986

The university breaks ground for the George and Irene Woodruff Residential Center.

1986

The Boisfeuillet Jones Center is dedicated.

1986

Feminist historian Elizabeth "Betsey" Fox-Genovese is recruited as the founding director for the Institute of Women's Studies at Emory, where she launches the nation's first doctoral program in women's studies.

1987

The university libraries add their 2,000,000th volume.

1987

The university's 150th anniversary year concludes with the graduation of the Sesquicentennial Class of 1987.

1987

The Emory/Georgia Tech Biomedical Research Consortium is established.

1987

Wesley Woods Geriatric Hospital opens.

1988

The University Libraries launches DOBIS, Emory's first computerized library catalogue and immediate predecessor to EUCLID.

1988

The Division of Library and Information Sciences awards its final degrees, and the program closes.

1989

Irish poet and, later, Nobel Prize-winner Seamus Heaney inaugurates the Richard Ellmann Lectures in Modern Literature, named in memory of Emory's first Robert W. Woodruff Professor.

1989

Manley Lanier "Sonny" Carter '69C-'73M rockets into space aboard the space shuttle Discovery. In addition to performing scientific experiments during the shuttle flight, Carter carries an ancient Babylonian artifact from the Emory Museum of Art and Archaeology.

1990

The Rollins School of Public Health is established.

1990

In December, following a year-long quiet planning phase, Emory formally launches the Campaign for Emory, with a goal of raising $400 million over five years. By the campaign's end, the university raises some $420 million. An additional $130 million in planned giving brings the University a charitable remainder worth $72 million.

1990

Spurred by a series of sexual assaults in the late 1980s, President James Laney forms a Task Force for Security and Responsibility to examine issues including security, medical services and counseling, and gender and racial sensitivity. A subsequent report recommends the creation of a Women's Resource Center.

1991

Emory University System of Health Care is established. The system is incorporated in 1994 and renamed Emory Healthcare in 1995.

1991

The Carter Center begins the Atlanta Project in collaboration with the university. This five-year effort to alleviate the social ills of the city results in inoculations of medically underserved children and streamlined social services, but concludes five years later as a noble experiment that did not meet all expectations.

1992

Ali Crown is named founding director of the Emory Women's Center, which opens in a modular trailer behind the Dobbs University Center. In 2004, renamed the Emory Center for Women, it moves to Cox Hall.

1992

Frances Lucas-Tauchar becomes Emory's first female vice president, serving as senior vice president and dean of Campus Life from 1992 - 2000.

1992

Mikhail Gorbachev, former president of the former USSR and a Nobel Peace Prize winner, draws such intense interest as Emory's Commencement speaker that the Quadrangle must be fenced for the first time.

1993

President Laney announces his intention to resign in order to serve as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea. Provost Billy Frye served as interim president until a search for Laney's successor is completed.

1993

Saralyn Chestnut becomes the first full-time director of Emory's Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LTBT) Life.

1994

William M. Chace, a Berkeley-trained scholar of Joyce and former president of Wesleyan University, is appointed Emory's 18th president.

1994

A $10-million gift from the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation and a vote of the university's Board of Trustees results in a name change for the Emory Business School to the Roberto C. Goizueta Business School of Emory University, honoring the Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company.

1994

The Carter Center formalizes an agreement with Emory and becomes a separately chartered, independently governed unit of the university.

1995

Emory is admitted to membership in the Association of American Universities, an organization of the most eminent public and private research universities in the United Sates and Canada.

1995

Emory becomes the first private university in the South to extend benefits to same-sex domestic partners of employees.

1995

The Emory Conference Center Hotel opens in the hardwood forest off Houston Mill Road. Designed to fit harmoniously into the natural environment, the facility features guest rooms and meeting space.

1997

Emory acquires the papers of Ted Hughes, Poet Laureate of Great Britain, to add to its extensive collection of manuscripts and materials of distinguished 20th-century poets.

1997

The denial of use of Oxford's Day Chapel by an Oxford employee for a same-sex commitment ceremony leads to debate about the appropriate balance between equal rights of gay and lesbian employees and adherence to principles of The United Methodist Church, with which the university is affiliated. Extensive discussions led to compromise guidelines for use of the chapels, as distinct from Glenn Memorial Church on the Druid Hills campus and Allen Memorial Church on the Oxford campus.

1997

The Phoenix Plan -- a comprehensive agreement for the university to manage fraternity houses in exchange for better fraternity governance -- is implemented, quickly becoming a model for other campuses to emulate.

1998

The XIVth Dalai Lama speaks at Commencement to great acclaim. While on campus for two days, he meets with representatives of Emory College and signs an agreement to establish an Emory program in Tibetan Buddhist Studies in Dharamsala, India, home of the Tibetan government in exile.

1998

Scouring the attic of Candler Library on a hunch, library staff discover "The Triumph of Alexander," a plaster frieze that had adorned the lobby of the library from the time of its construction in 1926 until its first renovation in 1955, at which point the frieze was boxed up and forgotten. The frieze is restored and remounted during renovation of the library in 2002-04.

1998

After two years of work, the university unveils a new Campus Master Plan to guide its physical planning for the next 50 years. Principles of the plan return the university to the architectural guidelines established by Henry Hornbostel in 1916.

1998

Emory acquires the former Briarcliff estate of Asa Candler Jr., which for several decades had been owned by the State of Georgia and operated as the Georgia Mental Health Institute.

1999

Enticed by a "going-out-of-business sale" at the Niagara Falls Museum and Daredevil Hall of Fame, the Carlos Museum raises $2 million from the Atlanta community to purchase a collection of Egyptian artifacts, including 10 mummies -- one of which was Ramesses I, the only pharaoh ever to leave Egypt.

1999

Building on programs in place for nearly two decades, Emory College launches the Institute for Jewish Studies.

1999

President Chace appoints the Committee on Traditions and Community Ties at Emory (the CONTACT Emory Committee) to recommend ways for improving the university's sense of community and tradition. After more than a year of work, the committee submits some 53 recommendations, ranging from improvement of signage to construction of residential colleges.

2000

The Miller-Ward Alumni House -- Emory's first building dedicated for use by the Association of Emory Alumni -- opens to acclaim. Visitors remark on "how beautifully restored the old building looks" even though it's new construction.

2000

Old Church in Oxford is rededicated. Built in 1841 as a college chapel and church for the town, the building had fallen into serious disrepair since its previous restoration in the 1970s. Old Church was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.

2001

Pitts Theology Library acquires its 500,000th volume, The Academic President as Moral Leader: James T. Laney at Emory University, 1977-1993 (Mercer University Press), by F. Stuart Gulley 1986T.

2001

Spurred by increasing interest in fostering a "green campus," the University Senate proposes an Environmental Mission Statement, which the administration adopts.

2002

The Clairmont Campus opens as a new "living/learning" environment with apartments for 1,600 students, athletic facilities and academic space.

2002

The U.S. Green Building Council awards certification for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) to Emory for the Whitehead Research Building, the first building in the Southeast to receive this recognition.

2002

University Distinguished Professor (and former U.S. President) Jimmy Carter wins the Nobel Peace Prize, the first Emory faculty member to win a Nobel Prize while serving on the faculty.

2002

In his ninth year as president, Bill Chace announces he will return to teaching as soon as his successor can be found.

2003

Nearly seven decades after the university first planned to build a center for performing arts, Emory dedicates the Donna and Marvin Schwartz Center for the Arts, named for an Emory alumna (Emory College Class of 1962) and her husband.

2003

James W. Wagner, a biomedical engineer and provost of Case-Western Reserve University, is appointed as Emory's 19th president.

2003

Following a $17-million renovation that required entirely gutting the structure from ground to roof beams, the Asa Griggs Candler Library is returned to its original splendor and rededicated.

2003

In a feat rarely duplicated, both the men's and the women's tennis teams win national team titles in NCAA Division III competition.

2004

Earl Lewis, dean of the graduate school at the University of Michigan, is appointed provost, becoming the highest-ranked African American in university history.

2004

The university announces the acquisition of the Raymond Danowski Poetry Collection, believed to be the largest private poetry collection ever built, comprising some 60,000 volumes and tens of thousands of periodicals and manuscripts.

2005

The university begins a 10-year strategic plan, Where Courageous Inquiry Leads.

2008

Campaign Emory begins. The fundraising effort goes on to raise more than $1.69 billion from nearly 150,000 donors.

2013

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama makes his third visit to campus as Presidential Distinguished Professor.

2016

The women's swimming and diving team wins the NCAA Division III national title for the seventh straight year. The women's tennis team won their second title in three years.

2016

Claire E. Sterk, an internationally acclaimed public health researcher, is unanimously selected by the Board of Trustees to seerve as the university's 20th president and its first female president.